Oh! Those Toilet Bowl Cleaners

CXRE » Lifestyle » Oh! Those Toilet Bowl Cleaners

So, here’s the deal.  If you had a product that contained hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, oxalic acid or sodium bisulfate, would you use it to clean in your home? Would you store it in your home, mix it in your house; leave sponges and/or mops that have come in contact with the chemicals in your home? Really?  Then, why are these products used by traditional cleaning companies to clean the buildings where most Americans spend as much time, if not more, than in their homes?

Doesn’t make sense does it?  Toilet bowl cleaners contain dangerous cleaning agents that may create a sense of cleanliness but at the expense of the overall well being of the building and its occupants.  If the cleaning company in your place of business is using these corrosive cleaning agents, you should ask them to stop.

In fact, those building bathrooms that sparkle and smell so clean are cleaned by other acid-based products that are corrosive in nature.  Rust cleaners, metal cleaners and drain cleaners are usually acid-based products that need to go.

These powerful agents actually contribute to the “sick building syndrome” that costs American business millions of lost sick days and billions of unproductive hours each year.  When these products come in contact with the skin, reddening, swelling and overall skin deterioration occurs.  Exposure to the eyes results in burning.  Ingestion can contribute to vomiting, diarrhea and nausea.

Not only are these products unhealthy upon contact but they also pollute the air. One of the central goals of green cleaning is to positively impact the building’s clean air system.  This commitment starts with the use of certified cleaning products that protect the building’s occupants and cleaning personnel and do not pollute the building’s air filtration system.

Green cleaning products enable proper cleaning techniques but not at the expense of health.  In fact, in green cleaning, less is often more.  Those dangerous traditional cleaners should go.  When they do, say hello to a healthier workplace.

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