What’s better? Mac or PC?

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The argument seems to never end. Mac or PC? Ask ten people and you can get ten different answers on why one is better than the other. However, the answer becomes much simpler when one variable is removed from the equation. Money. And when the cost is no longer a factor, the choices become much clearer. To put it simply, do you want a machine that has and can be personalized to your liking? Or do you prefer the most intuitive computer on the market?

The first option is a PC. If you want to personalize the innards of your computer, this is the one for you. Unlike a Mac, the PC is so user friendly anybody with little to no technical expertise can upgrade. A trip to the local Best Buy, access to Youtube, and a free afternoon, will result in the same person that couldn’t figure out how to use that VCR ten years ago having a finely tuned machine. The trick here is that parts are readily available, and extremely easy to install. Find out the graphics card is out of date? Twist four screws counter-clockwise, pull it out, and put in a new one. It couldn’t be any easier.

All of this, however, comes with a downside. PC’s are generally marketed for the entry-level shopper. They are made to be put on the shelf, running some flashy demo that attracts someone who knows absolutely nothing about computers. They need extensive upgrades to be able to run advanced programs. These upgrades are readily available, but are also not guaranteed to work with each other. This creates conflicts that require a fair to extensive amount of computer expertise to diagnose and rectify.

The second option is a Mac. Unlike the PC, for the most part you need to order the computer with the specifications required to accomplish your goals. And I make reference to ordering your Mac as opposed to buying it in the store. The options offered in the pre-built Macs are fine for the novice that doesn’t need much in their new computer. But, ordering your Mac affords you the opportunity to add RAM, a faster processor or graphics card, and even software without having to take the machine back to the Apple store for upgrades.

Since Apple must approve everything that “officially” interacts with their products, there are very few conflicts that occur when dealing with a Mac. In most instances, the system is completely “plug-and-play,” meaning you plug a peripheral into the USB and the Mac instantly recognizes it, configures it, and you are ready to use it. Also, Apple has its own operating system, Mac OS. The version changes with each iteration, but what doesn’t change is the ease of use. Drag-and-drop, spotlight searches, and even file management have been tweaked to seamless perfection.

Taking these facts into account, the Mac would be the obvious choice for intuitive work, while the PC is more in line with a smaller niche of the professional world. However, if money is not a factor, a PC can fit the bill, albeit much less efficiently.

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