CXRE » LEED certified

4 Tips for Getting LEED Certified

Set a clear environmental target.  Before you begin the design phase of your project, decide what level of LEED® certification you’re aiming for and settle on a firm overall budget.  Also, consider including an optional higher certification target — a “stretch” goal — to stimulate creativity. Set a budget that is clear, concise and adequate.  If you’re reaching for a higher level of certification, such as Platinum, additional expenditure will be required.  Budget for these extra steps accordingly. Stick to your budget and your LEED® goal.  Throughout out the design and building process, be sure your entire project team is focused on meeting your LEED® goal on budget.  Maintain the environmental and economic integrity of your project at every turn. Engineer for Life Cycle Value.  As you value-engineer your project, examine your green investments in terms of how they’ll affect expenses over the entire life of the building.  Before you decide to cut a line […]

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The Five W’s and Green Janitorial Services

If you own, manage or work in a U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified building, the chances are good that you like where you work.  These days, when every operating expense undergoes close scrutiny, building managers usually must be prepared to answer the five “w’s” about recruiting LEED approved cleaning companies.

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Green Cleaning For LEED Buildings

Building owners who pursue the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for their new or existing commercial buildings are performing an environmentally responsible act as well as making a prudent business decision.  As these building owners are fast discovering, much the merit of the LEED certification quickly transfers to the facility maintenance manager.

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The Federal Government and Green Cleaning

While green cleaning is a new concept and unfamiliar to many people in the cleaning business, a professional standard is evolving for the concept.  Elements of the new standards may find their roots in several federal government mandates.  Many federal agencies have already begun to evaluate and consider the use of environmentally preferable products and services.  Federal acquisitions and procurements now address environmental consequences.

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